Sept. 28: Epigenetics and Cancer: The Next Evolution in Cancer Therapeutics

Epigenetics—the study of inherited and acquired modifications in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the DNA itself—appears to be the next major trend in cancer research. It follows hard on the heels of the development of biological therapies in the 1980s and targeted therapies in the 1990s.

Scientists have known that cancer cells alter gene expression in healthy cells to promote their growth and survival, and to develop resistance to chemotherapy, radiation and targeted drugs. The next evolution in cancer therapy has been fueled in the lab as scientists begin to understand and influence the epigenetic controls of cancer-promoting gene expression. Now, researchers are evaluating epigenetic modifiers as new therapeutics in themselves, and as drugs to restore or extend the benefits of other cancer treatments.

Please join Science Writers in New York as we present a roundtable discussion of this new frontier in cancer therapeutics with leading researchers in the field.

When:
Tuesday, September 28, 2010
6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Where:
New York Academy of Sciences
7 World Trade Center
250 Greenwich Street, 40th floor

Cost:
Admission is free for 2010 dues-paid SWINY members. $5 for non-members

RSVP by Friday, September 24, 2010 (link)

Moderator
Joe Bonner
Co-Chair of SWINY and Director of Communications and Public Affairs, The Rockefeller University

Panelists
Jean-Pierre Issa, M.D.
Co-Director, Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Institute of Basic Science Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; Professor, Department of Leukemia, Chief, Section of Translational Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Stephen B. Baylin, M.D.
Deputy Director of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University; leader of the American Association of Cancer Research Stand Up to Cancer Epigenetics “Dream Team”

Edward A. Sausville, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Director for Clinical Research, Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland

Science Writers in New York thanks Syndax for support of this event.

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